In Remembrance – A Reassurance

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Wayne Michael DeHart  ( July, 2019 )

It seemed so simple, such an easy task.

Clear, concise, with no questions to ask.

Leave them a message, let it be read.

Let them know. that I’ll never be dead.

Must not exceed – three lines of fifteen.

Write what you feel, say what you mean.

My forever farewell, my unspoken word.

A final chance to be seen, to be heard.

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Can’t make it fit. Not quite enough space.

I’ll adjust and adapt. Revise and replace.

Remember the gold. Think of the green.

I’ll capture it all. In three lines of fifteen.

It’s where I’m going. It’s where I’ve gone.

It’s how I began. It’s how I’ve moved on.

It’s what I believe. It’s what I can see.

It’s my endless path. It’s my destiny.

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Here …

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IN … FIELDS … OF … GREEN … AND … GOLD … WE … WILL … ALWAYS … BE.

YOU … JUST … HAVE … TO … LOOK … CLOSE … AND … LISTEN … HARD.

TO … SEE … US … TO … HEAR … US … TO … FEEL … US … TO … BREATHE … US.

TO … BE … THERE … WITH … US.

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(the path leads home …)

7 thoughts on “In Remembrance – A Reassurance

  1. Pingback: Words you can touch – can touch you back | WORDSYOUCANTOUCH.COM – ( just a guy, writing …)

    • “Three lines of fifteen” – At the NH State Veterans Cemetery in Boscawen, headstones for cremated veterans whose remains are buried (rather than placed in a columbarium) allow for a maximum of three lines containing no more than 15 characters per line, including spaces, for a personal message. The longer message pictured above, beginning with “Lost, …” was going to be on my marker under previous planning. So when I made the decision for my “cremains” to be buried at NHSVC, I needed to find a way to alter a 64-character farewell into the limited space and still leave a visitor with the essence of my parting message – (1) We live forever (2) in fields of (3) green and gold. And that’s what prompted me to write this piece.

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      • As I thought. My father is here in a columbarium (thanks for the word, we were calling it a post office box). My brother ordered a plaque for him where the Navy memorial is and I remember his having a hard time fitting a lot into a little. You articulate the process so well. Your green and gold references remind me of John McCrae’s In Flanders Field, which I’m sure you’ve seen, but I sent to you via private message. This is a favorite of my husband whose brother was KIA in Vietnam. NH Veterans Cemetery is a beautiful, peaceful and soothing place. Each time I visit, there is more to see, more intriguing stories, if only three lines of 15. One can read so much into them.

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  2. Pingback: Words you can touch – can touch you Back | WORDSLEEVES.COM

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